Windows 10: Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)

Discus and support Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!) in User Accounts and Family Safety to solve the problem; Hi All First time question from me and it's not straightforward, but I'll try to be as succinct as I can.... My partner’s 12 year old son has an... Discussion in 'User Accounts and Family Safety' started by Stu_Lopher, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)


    Hi All


    First time question from me and it's not straightforward, but I'll try to be as succinct as I can....


    My partner’s 12 year old son has an acute gaming addiction (Fortnite, etc.). They live in Finland, me in the UK so I'm largely trying to deal with the issue from 1300 miles away.

    - He oroginally set up his MS account as an adult, and him as administrator on his (Windows 10) PC.

    - In order to try and help deal with his addiction I removed him as admin, made his mother admin, ‘cancelled’ his falsely created MS adult account, created a new MS child account, invited the child to join the group via the mother’s account, accepted the invite and set up gaming restriction times.


    This has not solved anything because:

    - MS policy provides an account ‘cool-off period’ of at least 30 days, even though the adult account was created by a child.

    - Changing the adult account to a child account does not help because MS recognises the original adult account only.

    - You cannot change the password during the 'cool off period' so the child still has full access

    - If you log in and use the account at any time during the cool off period it voids the original account closure request, so the kid logs in and it's happy days for him. Having dealt with probably around ten MS agents across many hours in the last month, not ONE alerted me to this until today.


    Apparently the only option is to raise it with MS engineers, but today's agent deleted the dialogue before I could record how to do so! Before doing so he did acknowledge that many agents won't have had any experience with this issue, hence why I've been given so much conflicting information.

    Meanwhile my partner - a single working mother with two other challenging kids in another country - is trying to single-handedly tackle acute gaming addiction that is severely affecting her 12 year old son's education: caused in part by some twisted 'Groundhog Day' Microsoft policy that blindly seeks account retention regardless of the circumstance.


    Any advice and guidance on how to pursue this issue would be much appreciated, folks.


    Best Wishes

    Stu

    :)
     
    Stu_Lopher, Oct 30, 2018
    #1

  2. Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)

    Hi All

    First time question from me and it's not straightforward, but I'll try to be as succinct as I can....

    My partner’s 12 year old son has an acute gaming addiction (Fortnite, etc.). They live in Finland, me in the UK so I'm largely trying to deal with the issue from 1300 miles away.

    - He oroginally set up his MS account as an adult, and him as administrator on his (Windows 10) PC.

    - In order to try and help deal with his addiction I removed him as admin, made his mother admin, ‘cancelled’ his falsely created MS adult account, created a new MS child account, invited the child to join the group via the mother’s account, accepted
    the invite and set up gaming restriction times.

    This has not solved anything because:

    - MS policy provides an account ‘cool-off period’ of at least 30 days, even though the adult account was created by a child.

    - Changing the adult account to a child account does not help because MS recognises the original adult account only.

    - You cannot change the password during the 'cool off period' so the child still has full access

    - If you log in and use the account at any time during the cool off period it voids the original account closure request, so the kid logs in and it's happy days for him. Having dealt with probably around ten MS agents across many hours in the last
    month, not ONE alerted me to this until today.

    Apparently the only option is to raise it with MS engineers, but today's agent deleted the dialogue before I could record how to do so! Before doing so he did acknowledge that many agents won't have had any experience with this issue, hence why I've
    been given so much conflicting information.

    Meanwhile my partner - a single working mother with two other challenging kids in another country - is trying to single-handedly tackle acute gaming addiction that is severely affecting her 12 year old son's education: caused in part by some twisted
    'Groundhog Day' Microsoft policy that blindly seeks account retention regardless of the circumstance.

    Any advice and guidance on how to pursue this issue would be much appreciated, folks.

    Best Wishes

    Stu
     
    Stu_Lopher, Oct 30, 2018
    #2
  3. BulldogXX Win User
    Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)

    Your friend is not going to have it easy no matter what, because fundamentally, game providers don't give a d*mn about protecting our children. Same for other content providers like YouTube, Spotify, Facebook, etc. There's no money in protecting children.

    From a technical perspective, there's a great deal of third-party parental control software from developers who do this for a living (so expect to pay.) I actually found that European developers did a much better job at this - they must have stricter laws
    over there. (I'm writing from the US.)

    As for Microsoft's policies ... you may as well forget about it. They have millions of different peoples' opinions to deal with.
     
    BulldogXX, Oct 30, 2018
    #3
  4. Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)

    Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)

    Thanks for the response BulldogXX, much appreciated.

    To clarify, I suppose I'm asking two different things: how best to control the gaming from a tech perspective, and secondly how best to pursue Microsoft's flagrant 'inability' to deal with a kid setting up an adult account, and the associated consequences.

    It took a twelve year old approximately five seconds to set up an adult account (date of birth entry), yet trying to unpick the consequences of those five seconds appear insurmountable. That's not right, so in my view Microsoft does have a responsibility
    to answer for this.

    My primary question then, is how can I pose that question to Microsoft in the most constructive way.

    Cheers

    Stu
     
    Stu_Lopher, Oct 30, 2018
    #4
Thema:

Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)

Loading...
  1. Acute child gaming addiction vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!) - Similar Threads - Acute child gaming

  2. Installing approved game purchase on childs PC

    in Windows 10 Gaming
    Installing approved game purchase on childs PC: I have purchased and approved the install of minecraft for my childs laptop. How do I install it on my childs laptop? https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/installing-approved-game-purchase-on-childs-pc/d4f406c0-6361-40ec-8617-4384a7b18679
  3. Child Microsoft Account

    in User Accounts and Family Safety
    Child Microsoft Account: HI I set up a child account with the correct birthdate that shows my childs age as 12y old - however it lists him as an Adult - How do I change him to a child. https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/child-microsoft-account/deed6fb6-15a1-4b74-b6f5-6d4a1cd23d5f"
  4. Microsoft family child removal not working

    in Windows 10 Drivers and Hardware
    Microsoft family child removal not working: I was recently removed from my Microsoft family account, with help from Microsoft support, the support person told me that if I restarted my computer I would be removed from the family. After restarting the computer I still had to ask to use google, when I clicked the ask by...
  5. Password policies and microsoft accounts.

    in AntiVirus, Firewalls and System Security
    Password policies and microsoft accounts.: Hey everyone, Just wondering why does the password policies not work on Microsoft accounts in windows 10? https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/password-policies-and-microsoft-accounts/667c2de2-165e-4f15-9f7f-ba550a119769"
  6. Microsoft Privacy Policy

    in Windows 10 Installation and Upgrade
    Microsoft Privacy Policy: Because Edward Snowden illegally stole documents from my government we know Microsoft was working secretly with government. Are they still doing this? How do we know and why would we believe its not happening any longer? Microsoft never apologized nor were they ever...
  7. Microsoft Family Child Permissions

    in User Accounts and Family Safety
    Microsoft Family Child Permissions: I want to block Google Hangouts which has an address of hangouts.google.com But my child needs access to Google Docs which has an address of google.com/drive My question is can I block certain sites in google.com but allow others? Thanks! Larry...
  8. Acute child gaming addiction/fraudulent account vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!)

    in Windows 10 Gaming
    Acute child gaming addiction/fraudulent account vs Microsoft Policy (aaaggghhh!!): Hi All First time question from me and it's not straightforward, but I'll try to be as succinct as I can.... My partner’s 12 year old son has an acute gaming addiction (Fortnite, etc.). They live in Finland, me in the UK so I'm largely trying to deal with the issue from...
  9. Settings App vs. Group Policy Editor Re: Telemetry

    in Windows 10 Support
    Settings App vs. Group Policy Editor Re: Telemetry: Is it necessary to also change settings in the Group Policy Editor if I have already done so in the settings app. Looking at this link this morning: https://www.ghacks.net/2018/03/12/co...ry-windows-10/ and in the settings app diagnostics is set to basic. Do I also need...
  10. Gaming addiction classified as disorder by WHO

    in Windows 10 News
    Gaming addiction classified as disorder by WHO: Its 11th International Classification of Diseases (ICD) will include the condition "gaming disorder". The draft document describes it as a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour so severe that it takes "precedence over other life interests". Some countries...